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Hnimêk

Wetland, Natural beach in Ouvéa
  • A fascinating ecosystem threatened by rising waters, the extreme north of the main island of Ouvéa offers landscapes suspended between sky and sea.

  • The north of the island of Ouvéa is a long procession of islets that stretch into the Great Ocean. Listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since July 2008, the lagoon of this atoll, with a perfume of Polynesia, offers the intimate sensations of land that is still virgin. The sea and the sky mingle in a mist of intense light. Antoine leads his hikers to the sustaining mangrove, the dry forest and the shark nursery. At the beginning of the hot season, dozens of lemon sharks (Negaprion...
    The north of the island of Ouvéa is a long procession of islets that stretch into the Great Ocean. Listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since July 2008, the lagoon of this atoll, with a perfume of Polynesia, offers the intimate sensations of land that is still virgin. The sea and the sky mingle in a mist of intense light. Antoine leads his hikers to the sustaining mangrove, the dry forest and the shark nursery. At the beginning of the hot season, dozens of lemon sharks (Negaprion acutidens), black-tip lagoon sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus), and white-tip lagoon or coral sharks (Triaenodon obesus) gather in the lagoon near the beach to mate and streak the blue surface with their fins. A journey of sand, coral, light and wind. He guides walkers towards the Faasi Channel, a breach that separates the main island of Iaaï from the Islet Unyee which is home to a huge mangrove area rich in biodiversity, where the inhabitants of the Teouta Tribe go crab fishing.
  • Spoken languages
    • French
Openings
Openings
  • All year 2024
    Open Everyday
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