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Kanak legends of the bonhomme de Bourail

Historic site and monument, Historic patrimony in Bourail
  • The presence of the Bonhomme de Bourail is deeply rooted in the local landscape and culture, as it is an integral part of the region's Kanak legends.

  • The bonhomme de Bourail is an emblem of the region, not only because of its characteristic shape, well known to Caledonians, but also because it is a place of legend for the Kanak people. The Orôê and Neku languages, spoken in the Ajië-Aro cultural area, have given the names "Dixèlè" and "Poyâxè" to the Roche Percée and the bonhomme de Bourail. According to Melanesian tradition, an opening beside the bonhomme serves as a passageway for the dead to reach the realm of the dead. To reach the...
    The bonhomme de Bourail is an emblem of the region, not only because of its characteristic shape, well known to Caledonians, but also because it is a place of legend for the Kanak people. The Orôê and Neku languages, spoken in the Ajië-Aro cultural area, have given the names "Dixèlè" and "Poyâxè" to the Roche Percée and the bonhomme de Bourail. According to Melanesian tradition, an opening beside the bonhomme serves as a passageway for the dead to reach the realm of the dead. To reach the realm of the dead, they plunge down from the cliff from the ancient belvedere, before joining their ancestors in the waves. According to Kanak legends, the bonhomme de Bourail is the guardian of paradise, responsible for welcoming the dead into the other world.
  • Environment
    • Waterside
    • Beach within 300 m
    • Sea view
  • Spoken languages
    • French
Services
  • Equipment
    • Car park
    • Free car park
  • Services
    • Pets welcome
      • During the large-headed turtle egg-laying season (November-February), dogs are forbidden on Roche Percée beach and Tortoise Bay to avoid disturbing the turtles or destroying their nests.
Openings
Openings
  • All year 2024
    Open Everyday
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