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Northern Pleiades

Island in Ouvéa
  • The Atoll of Ouvéa is closed to the west by a string of uninhabited islets and sandbanks that stretch like comet tails clinging to the ends of the main island, these are known as the Northern and Southern Pleiades, and they are separated by the Anemata Pass.

  • In geological times, the atoll of Ouvéa gradually collapsed in the west, giving rise to the islands of the Pleiades. Those of the North can be explored from Saint-Joseph. These maritime outings in a dream setting are encounters blessed by the gods with the graceful presence of Manta rays and schools of teasing dolphins, and a lunch break on one of the islands, some of which have been given the Polynesian name of Motus (Motu Niu, Motu Awa...) Further north, the Beautemps-Beaupré Atoll is a...
    In geological times, the atoll of Ouvéa gradually collapsed in the west, giving rise to the islands of the Pleiades. Those of the North can be explored from Saint-Joseph. These maritime outings in a dream setting are encounters blessed by the gods with the graceful presence of Manta rays and schools of teasing dolphins, and a lunch break on one of the islands, some of which have been given the Polynesian name of Motus (Motu Niu, Motu Awa...) Further north, the Beautemps-Beaupré Atoll is a triangular ocean bank of 120 km2, accessible only with permission from the customary authorities, it is the refuge of an extraordinarily preserved fauna. The island bears the name of the father of modern hydrography, Charles de Beautemps-Beaupré (1766-1854), who was chosen in 1791 by Admiral d'Entrecasteaux to go in search of the lost frigates of the French explorer La Pérouse.
  • Spoken languages
    • French
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